AM 529b, Winter 2004

Introduction to Supersymmetry


Time & Place: M 16:00-17:30, W 13:00-14:00; Room: WSC 156

Instructor: Alex Buchel, office: WSC 115, Ext: 88794, E-mail: abuchel[at]uwo.ca

Office hours: after lecture or by appointment.


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Prerequisites Course Outline Text Course Evaluation Lecture Notes Homework Other Notes Feedback

Prerequisites:

On the physics side, the minimum requirement is:
1. Lagrangian formulation of classical mechanics.
2. Maxwell equations, Lorentz invariance (special relativity).
3. Quantum Mechanics.
A basic knowledge of QFT (gauge theories, Feynmann diagrams, renormalization) is highly desirable. If you did not take a QFT course before, I strongly recommend to enroll simultaneously into AM 516a. Quantum Field Theory, taught by Prof. Gerry McKeon this semester. In this course we will be using low-energy effective action approach to (supersymmetric) QFT's, which is complementary to the techniques developed in AM 516a.

On the math side:
1. Analysis on the complex plane (holomorphy, analytical continuation)
2. Rudimentory group theory (SU(2), Lorentz group).


Course outline:

I. Qualitative supersymmetry:
II. Perturbative supersymmetry:
III. Nonabeliean gauge theories:
IV. Nonperturbative supersymmetry:
V. Supersymmetric theories with low-energy photons (Seiberg-Witten model)

Text:

The primary text are lecture notes "Introduction to Global Supersymmetry" by Philip Argyres, available at http://www.physics.uc.edu/~argyres/661/index.html.

Course evaluation:

Course grade will be based on 2 homework assignments. There will be no final exam. For people really interested in learning the subject, there will be additional 'suggested exercises' at the end of each lecture. I will not post solutions to these additional problems, but will be happy to discuss them during my office hours.

Lecture notes:

Additional lecture notes will be posted here.

Homework:

Homework/solutions will be posted here.

Other notes:

1. A very nice introductory book to N=1 supersymmetry in four dimensions is by Julius Wess and Jonathan Bagger, "Supersymmetry and Supergravity"
2. A more advanced book is "Superspace, or 1001 Lessons in Supersymmetry" by Jim Gates, Marc Grisaru, Martin Rocek and Warren Siegel, available at http://arxiv.org/abs/hep-th/0108200

Feedback:

Feedback to the instructor regarding the quality, speed, and content of presentation is especially appreciated during the semester!